Abstract

Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma for Neck and Lower Back Pain Secondary to Spinal Disc Herniation: Midterm Results

Background: Spinal disc herniation (HNP) can be a painful condition caused by a variety of traumatic events and degenerative conditions. It is one of the most common spine conditions in adults, occurring in both cervical and lumbar regions. Although these injuries are often associated with wear and tear (or degeneration), traumatic events such as automobile accidents or lifting injuries have been described as causes.

Methodology: We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical study to evaluate the safety and midterm effectiveness of autologous platelet rich plasma injections (PRP) to treat neck and Low Back Pain (LBP) caused by spinal disc herniation (HNP). All patients had failed conservative treatment for 3 months to 6 months. The autologous PRP was performed using a table top centrifuge device and a standardized individual PRP preparation protocol method. Patients were followed annually for up to 8 years post-operatively. Pain status was documented using a visual analog scale self-reported measure, as well as the Oswestry disability score.

Results: Eighty-eight consecutive patients with spinal disc herniation (HNP) were enrolled; thirty-eight were treated for cervical disc herniation, thirty-eight for lumbar disc herniation, and twelve were treated for both cervical and lumber disc herniation. The duration of follow-up ranged from 4 months to 8 years (mean of 5 years). 87% of patients reported a successful outcome. Within the cervical group, the preoperative visual analog scale showed 81% improvement (P ≤ 0.01). For the lumbar patients, the preoperative visual analog scale improved by 77% (P ≤ 0.01). No complications were reported.

Conclusion: The results are durable with successful outcomes observed 8 years after procedure.


Author(s):

Julian A Cameron* and Katelyn M Thielen



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